Radical Acceptance and Scapegoat Recovery: The Power of Accepting What IS

Radical Acceptance and Scapegoat Recovery: The Power of Accepting What IS

Releasing attachment to highly charged emotions and events does not mean that one is “giving up” on themselves or “giving in” to abuse from others. It is simply a process that supports people in coping with past and/or current life circumstances that cannot be changed and that they are powerless over.

Scapegoating, Narcissism, and Reactive Abuse

Scapegoating, Narcissism, and Reactive Abuse

Reactive abuse is when someone who is a victim of abuse (family scapegoating abuse, in this case) reacts to the abuse in such a manner that if an outside person were to be a fly on the wall observing, it would make it look like they, and not the perpetrator, are the abuser.

The Dual Layers of Betrayal Trauma For Survivors of Family Scapegoating Abuse

The Dual Layers of Betrayal Trauma For Survivors of Family Scapegoating Abuse

Betrayal is at the heart of being scapegoated. Betrayal is the constant in all the examples shared in this article. When exploring our scapegoating histories we see that our trauma doesn’t just come from the hurtful actions, the cruel words, the painful neglect and humiliations, or the psychological wounds wielded out by family members. Our trauma extends beyond tangible incidents: It permeates our psyches and our physiology…

Scapegoating and The Fantasy of Vindication and Validation

Scapegoating and The Fantasy of Vindication and Validation

For many scapegoated adults, the difficult reality is that repair and reunion with their family simply isn’t possible. For some, it is a conscious choice to stay away from their toxic family system as attempting to re-integrate would result in further psycho-emotional injury. Others were unceremoniously ‘ejected’ from their family-of-origin when they began to assert boundaries or call out the abuse, making any type of reconciliation both undesirable and impossible.

Trauma-Informed Treatment for Adult Survivors of FSA

Trauma-Informed Treatment for Adult Survivors of FSA

In this article, I discuss the Trauma-Informed Stabilization Treatment (TIST) model and why I choose to use this particular trauma treatment modality in my private psychotherapy practice when working with clients who are suffering from Family Scapegoating Abuse (FSA) and Complex Trauma symptoms.

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